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Get Ready: Big Changes Are Coming To Medical Marijuana Growing in Oklahoma



In a push to gain more control over medical cannabis growth operations, the Oklahoma State Legislature has proposed a string of new bills. This comes after a failed attempt to legalize marijuana for recreational use.


The proposed regulations seek to create a more structured system for cultivating medical cannabis, with clear guidelines for licensing, zoning, and inspection. As the medical cannabis industry continues to boom, Oklahoma hopes to stay ahead of the curve and help prevent illicit operations with these progressive measures.


Lawmakers in Oklahoma are introducing House Bill 2095, which could have major implications for the state's cannabis industry. If passed, the bill would give more power to the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigations, the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control, and the state Attorney General to enforce cannabis regulations alongside the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority (OMMA). This could mean more inspections of grow facilities without warning and potentially stricter compliance measures for cannabis businesses across the state.

The new bill proposes to extend the existing moratorium on new grow licenses until 2026. This means that no new licenses will be issued until at least August of that year. That's not all - the bill also includes a provision that revokes licenses and forbids future business licenses for any grower who fails to pay their taxes to the OMMA. So make sure you keep your books in order or risk losing your license and potential future opportunities in the medical marijuana industry.


There are some noteworthy bills that are making waves in the legislative world right now. One of them is Senate Bill 116, introduced by Senators George Burns and David Bullard. If it passes, it could have a big impact on cannabis growers in Oklahoma. The proposed law would prohibit growing any cannabis within 1,000 feet of a place of worship.


Another bill proposed SB 913, would require these businesses to purchase a $50,000 bond from the state. This bond acts as a security deposit and will be utilized if the grower breaks the law, loses their license, or abandons their property altogether. The funds from the bond will be used to correct any environmental damage and restore the land to its original condition, Sponsored by Senators Darcy Jech and Anthony Moore.


Oklahoma lawmakers are considering a new bill that could put a stop to environmentally harmful cannabis cultivation practices. Senate Bill 808 would give the state's medical marijuana regulator the power to revoke a grower's license or issue a cease and desist if they are found to cause environmental damage. The bill is sponsored by Senator Joe Newhouse and is part of a larger effort to ensure that Oklahoma's rapidly growing cannabis industry operates in a way that benefits both consumers and the environment.

Oklahoma lawmakers have proposed Senate Bill 806, which could shake things up for cannabis growers in the state. Sponsored by Sen. Brent Howard and Rep. Jon Echols, the bill would require growers to provide proof of land ownership before they can receive a license to cultivate cannabis. This move has sparked conversations in the industry, as it may weed out those who lease the facilities they use to grow.


Lawmakers in Oklahoma are taking steps to crack down on illegal operations and safeguard the health of patients who rely on medical marijuana. These measures aim to ensure that only safe, high-quality products are sold to those who need them most and that only licensed, reputable businesses are producing medical cannabis in Oklahoma.


All the bills have been given the green light by their respective origin chambers! However, the journey is far from over as they make their way through the winding legislative process. Stay tuned as we follow the progress and see what groundbreaking changes may be in store.



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